The Crimson White

#Bamasits protest continues after threats and derogatory remarks

Jonathan Norris

Jonathan Norris

CW / Jonathan Norris

Will Jones

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While the National Anthem was played during Alabama’s football game against Texas A&M on Saturday, the group #bamasits continued their protest of racial injustice across the country.

The group’s members first received attention when they sat during the national anthem during the Alabama’s homecoming football game against Kentucky, mimicking the protests of NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick. After the game, a group called Bama Stands was created as a counter protest.

Later, Bama Stands posted an event in the Alabama Student Ticket Exchange on Facebook. Students soon began to comment on the event, and in the Exchange, about the event and the two groups. Comments came pouring in, some of which contained threats and prejudicial statements towards members of #bamasits.

One student, Ryan Parish, sent racially-specific statements and threats, including, “I’ll kill you n*****.” Parish was suspended and removed from campus, pending the completion of the expulsion process.

Since that time, #bamasits has continued to protest with no intention of stopping anytime soon.

Alexus Porter, a sophomore majoring in accounting, said the number of people involved in the protest was the only thing that changed following the various threats and racially-specific comments.

“For the Kentucky game there was about 25 [protestors] or, you know, 15-20 of us and then [against Texas A&M] there was about 30 [or] 40,” she said.

Porter said during the game two individuals came and stood in the front of the group as a way to try and prevent #bamasits from being seen. Porter said other than that, there have not really been any other attempts to prevent the group from protesting.

“We’re going to continue to sit at the rest of the home games as well as, you know, we’re not even sure –– we may even go to basketball games as well,” she said.

Cody Leach, a freshman majoring in political science and supporter of Bama Stands, said Bama Stands has likewise seen increased support. Although he is just a supporter of the group and not a representative of it, Leach said the increased support from individuals of all races, genders and backgrounds has been overwhelming. 

Leach mentioned that the groups’ standing for the National Anthem is meant to show respect to police officers, members of the military and others who have sacrificed for their country. 

“It’s a sign of respect, not a counter protest,”  Leach said.

The Crimson White will continue to follow both groups as Alabama’s football season continues.

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#Bamasits protest continues after threats and derogatory remarks