Axe throwing offers a spin on traditional nightlife

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Axe throwing offers a spin on traditional nightlife

CW / Joe Will Field

CW / Joe Will Field

CW / Joe Will Field

CW / Joe Will Field

Jimmy Conroy | @jimC__, Contributing Writer

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Civil Axe Throwing is expanding its business from Huntsville to Tuscaloosa, offering people the chance to learn the art of axe throwing and compete in games with friends and family.

Axe throwing is growing in popularity, and Tuscaloosa is next in line of cities eager to adopt this sport into their rotation of Friday night activities. Civil Axe Throwing is set to hold its grand opening of a new downtown location on Oct. 11, inviting people to channel their inner lumberjack and take part in friendly competition.

People ages 14 and up are encouraged to rent out a stall for an hour to compete in a game that is comparable to darts, where participants throw axes at a target, aiming to land as close to the bullseye as possible. While the scoring may be similar, manager Grant Stovall sees axe throwing as more than just a game.

“A lot of people will compare it to, say, throwing darts or a bowling alley or whatever, but I think the big difference here is that this is more of an experience than it is going to play a game,” Stovall said.

Offering a BYOB policy and affordable hourly rates, it’s clear why Tuscaloosa was an area that was thought to be a great spot for the new location. Tuscaloosa is a great spot for Civil Axe Throwing because of the visibility the building will receive from both college students and permanent residents, as it is situated in a strip of bars that includes Rhythm and Brews, 1831 and Copper Top.

Originally started in Huntsville in 2017, the addition of a Tuscaloosa Civil Axe Throwing location brings the total to 11 Civil Axe Throwing establishments around the country. Stovall highlighted the successes of various locations in smaller towns, including Montgomery and Oxford, Mississippi.

“There is nothing to do in Montgomery, not even a little bit,” Stovall said. “So you move into a new city and there is nothing to do, and then you find out about something like this and you’re like ‘OK, cool. I can actually do something fun here.’”

Whether it be a group looking to grab a drink and throw some axes before a night out on the town or friends seeking out a fun time away from the party and bar scene, the venue accommodates all people and fosters an even playing field.

“It’s a completely inclusive sport,” Stovall said. “Very seldom are men better than women and vice versa. It’s nice to see that kind of diversity, and people have a good time no matter how old you are or who you are.”

Becca Cleffi, a junior majoring in mechanical engineering, sees this business as a way to shake up the nightlife options.

“It would be something different to do rather than just going to a bar,” said Cleffi. “I don’t think there are many options for college kids, especially for those who don’t participate in Greek life and those not old enough to get into bars.”

Maddie Brolly, a senior majoring in business and psychology, echoed that sentiment.

“All we have available to us is to drink, so we need other options,” said Brolly. “Axe throwing would be awesome and also a great way to take out my anger.”